Published on January 6th, 2010 | by Ozlem Avcioglu

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Browns Hotel, London, UK

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Set in the heart of Mayfair on Albemarle Street, Brown’s is one of the most historic hotels as it was the first ever hotel to open in London in 1837 by former gentleman’s servant, James Brown, when he acquired four adjacent houses in Dover Street.  Composed of 11 Georgian town houses, all 117 bedrooms (including 29 luxurious suites) have been individually designed in traditional English style and elegance.

The hotel is also known with historical events: Alexander Graham Bell made the world’s first telephone call from the hotel in 1876; it was the first hotel to have a lift installed; Rudyard Kipling wrote many of his works there, having first visited in 1892; Theodore Roosevelt stayed there prior to his second marriage in 1886, and Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt later spent part of their honeymoon there in 1905. Queen Victoria visited the hotel as did other members of European royalty including King George of the Hellenes, whilst he waited for the monarchy to be restored in Greece in 1935, and the Queen of the Netherlands. During the Second World War – in room 36 – the Dutch government in exile declared war on Japan, an event that soon led to the occupation of the Dutch East Indies.  Brown’s Hotel joined The Rocco Forte Collection in 2003.

The hotel has many amenities, like The Donovan Bar, which will be lined with iconic images taken by celebrated British photographer Terence Donovan; The English Tea Room, serving the most famous afternoon tea in London and a spa.

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About the Author

Ozlem Avcioglu

Each city has its own light, identity and color ️Traveler photographer writer owner of Haaz design. Based in Istanbul and NY, live around the world.



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